Geographic Cure

Geographic Cures and Denial

Q. I've heard people at meetings refer to “geographicals,” or “geographical cures.” What's that about?

Hand-drawn map of North America, 1811 -- Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division

A geographical cure is an attempt to avoid the reality of our addiction by changing location.  They are a form of denial, a defense mechanism in which we are faced with a fact that is too uncomfortable to accept and so we convince ourselves that it is not true despite what may be overwhelming evidence.

Excuses are a major form of denial. We learn their usefulness as small children: “She hit me first!” We usually grow out of that phase, but for addicts the need to make excuses and convince ourselves and others that we're really okay is our way of protecting the addiction. We say things like, “If you were married to that bitch,” or “If you'd seen the things I've seen…,” all of which, we have convinced ourselves, justify our drinking, drugging or whatever we may prefer not to look at too closely. (If we did, we might have to do something about it.)

So, when things get rough, we sometimes convince ourselves that all we need is a fresh start in a new place, and we'll be able to get our lives back under control. However, unless our geographical cure has also involved detox, treatment and a program of recovery, we discover that it doesn't take long for the things that we thought we'd left behind to hop out of the trees and right onto our backs again.

We failed to consider one of life's major truths: No Matter Where You Go, There You Are!  We need to change our way of living, not where we live.

Hitting the road doesn't solve our problems, it just means that we have to face them in a strange place, among strangers.  If, however, we decide to get out of the old neighborhood and get some help, that's not necessarily such a bad idea.