Opiates

2016 New York State Record for Overdose Deaths

NY witnessed a new record for overdose deaths, exceeding 1,000 in 2016.

New York closed 2016 with a new record: over 1,000 heroin overdose deaths. This continues an upward trend noted years ago, which has continued to challenge New York residents and their families, as well as policy makers and health care providers.

In June of 2016, New York State issued a report showing 2014 data on heroin abuse and drug overdose deaths. As of 2014, New York was outpacing other states in the growth of heroin use and the number of people seeking treatment for addiction disorders involving heroin.

In 2014, heroin overdose was a contributing cause for 825 deaths.

The 2016 numbers are in and things look much worse. Over 1000 deaths from heroin overdose in 2016, an increase of 17.5 % from 2004 numbers.

While New York had been leading the nation in growth of heroin overdoses for many years, it did not lead in heroin overdose deaths nor prescription opioid overdoses (those attributed to prescription drugs like oxycodone, hydrocodone, and other opiate-like synthetic opioids).

In one year (2014) heroin use in New York exceeded the national average rate by 50 per cent!

Upward trends in drug abuse are difficult to stop. New York State agencies are scrambling to provide treatment options, considering expanding the existing Pilgrim State psychiatric facility on Long Island.

Suffolk County, Long Island Drug Addiction and Treatment

Suffolk County on Long Island had the highest death toll from heroin overdose, at 111 dead. That's more deaths from overdose in Suffolk County than the the Bronx and Brooklyn combined.

Suffolk also experience an additional 96 deaths attributed to opioid overdose (non-heroin, which includes prescription pain killers).

 

Fooled you once, Now You’re Dead

My collegue John Moriarty in New Jersey has published a blog post warning of the dangers of fentanyl, a powerful drug that drug dealers in NJ are mixing into their products. It is a very important issue. Small doses of fentanyl can kill quickly.

But fentanyl isn't the only deadly substance being distributed by drug dealers. In one day, 15 people died of overdoses in one day Camden, NJ. Police say it wasn't fentanyl.

Fool me once, now I'm dead.

Drug dealers are in the business of profiting by exploiting the trust their customers place in them. Whether it comes sooner or later, the drug dealer will take everything he can, leaving the customer at great risk, or even dead.

You don't get a second chance at recovery if you're dead.

As we see more and more individuals become addicted to prescription pain killers, we see more driven to buy illegally, in order to obtain enough to sustain an active addiction and avoid withdrawal sickness. But buying illegally means doing business with a drug dealer. And drug dealers seek profits first, even if it means fooling the customer with a cheap, custom mix of chemicals that can kill.

We are here for those who need help 1-888-443-3869.

 

Now Playing : Deadly in Small Doses

Fentanyl pills made to look like difficult to buy 80mg Oxycontin pills. These were confiscated by police in a 2015 drug bust.

Fentanyl pills made to look like difficult-to-buy 80mg Oxycontin pills. These were confiscated by police in a 2015 drug bust.

We are used to hearing the phrase “deadly in high doses”. Many drugs can be deadly in high doses. Now we are seeing something new : deadly in SMALL doses.

The powerful drug fentanyl, another man-made opioid like oxycontin (oxycodone) and hydrocodone, is showing up on the streets. It is pressed into pills similar to oxycodone, colored to look like common painkillers, and of course mixed into street drugs like heroin. Fentanyl is deadly in small doses. Even a small amount of the powder can kill even an experience opioid or heroin user accustomed to high doses of opiates/painkillers.

Dangerous mixtures of drugs like fentanyl are killing quickly in New Jersey these days. Last year New Jersey suffered sudden deaths from Newark to Cape May, as drug dealers experimented with poly drug formulas they then sold as heroin, or marketed as a replacement for increasingly expensive pain pills.

Prescription painkillers are commonly abused these days, which can lead to addiction. Even regular folks who never used drugs recreationally are finding themselves “dependent” on these opioids. Many are coming into detox centers in NJ reporting that a few pills per day became several and then 7 or 8 per day, before they ran out of supply and realized they had a dependency problem.

Opioids don't want to let you go. If you become dependent, and try to stop, your body will urge you to continue taking the drugs. The withdrawal sickness that comes after stopping the drug is often enough to make one return to the drug, just to not-feel-sick. With high doses, the withdrawal sickness can be so severe that injecting heroin doesn't seem like such a bad idea – if it makes the sickness go away.

That's how heroin addiction works these days. And New Jersey now has a heroin epidemic on its hands.

Medical Detox is the first step in addressing a painkiller addiction. The medical detox process manages the withdrawal sickness for you, while the rest of the detox process supports someone getting clear of the drugs and into the proper path for recovering from the addiction. Addiction wreaks havoc with family, personal, and professional lives. Addicts need help.

In a top-tier medical detox facility like Sunrise Detox Toms River, Sunrise Detox Cherry Hill, or Sunrise Detox Stirling/Long Hill, the “Detox with Dignity” program focuses on eliminating the influence of the drug and withdrawal sickness, while providing concierge-like customer service, and a comfortable and supportive environment with around-the-clock medical care certified addiction counselors at every step of the way.

The best way to start is with a Detox with Dignity, where counselors help customize an individualized treatment plan which can include rehab, counseling, local outpatient treatment, with medical and psychological support as appropriate.

FDA Approves Oxycontin for Children Aged 11-16 years

The FDA has issued an approval for the prescription of Oxycontin for children between the ages of 11 and 16 (commonly known as “teens” and referred to as “adolescents” in the treatment industry).

Oxycontin is a brand of extended-release oxycodone, a synthetic opioid whose chemical structure mimics heroin. Oxycontin is the original brand of opioid painkiller from Perdue Pharma which was heavily over-prescribed in its early years, fueling a wave of addiction that has helped create an unprecedented demand for the much cheaper but chemically similar heroin.

The early “extended release” Oxycontin was easily manipulated so that large dose intended for gradual release throughout the day could actually be delivered all at once. An addict could access super doses of oxycodone from the pills, which made them valuable on the black market. As with most opiates and opioids, higher doses lead to higher levels of need, fueling addiction. The FDA revoked approval of that product under pressure from the addiction treatment industry and others, once more effective “extended release” methods were developed.

The approval of OxyContin for children followed 3 years of clinical trials, review, and approval by the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) at the FDA. The review panel at CDER believes that OxyContin is “different from most other drugs in its class because it has been reformulated to better resist being crushed or dissolved”, which “discourages abuse by nasal or intravenous (IV)” use.

Only one other extended-release drug is specifically approved for extreme pain management in adolescents. Duragesic, a brand of fentanyl, is an extremely powerful opioid, estimated to be up to 100 times the strength of pure heroin. In 2015 over a dozen deaths were recorded in New Jersey when drug dealers introduced fentanyl-laced heroin into the street markets. Addicts sought the extreme highs promised by such a powerful drug, but almost immediately died from overdose.

Physicians are generally free to prescribe and use any drugs regardless of specific FDA approvals, using their own professional discretion (known as “off-label use” which is commonplace). Adult formulations of opioids, opiates, and other analgesics have been given to adolescents when necessary. The warnings and precautions for pediatric patients are the same as for adults.

Heroin addiction is now considered near epidemic levels in many states, including New Jersey, and heroin use is known to follow prescription opioid abuse when access to the prescription pills is suddenly shut off. Individuals addicted to the opioid pills find themselves desperate for an equivalent, and heroin is widely available, cheaper, and equivalent.

Heroin addiction is a now a serious problem among teens in New Jersey, where detox centers have to treat adolescents, and after school rehab programs provided intensive outpatient treatment designed to educate addicted teens and help them return to society free of dependency on drugs or alcohol.

Many more brands of opioids and opiates are now available on the market, but Purdue Pharma did clinical trials which support this FDA decision.

In 2012 Purdue Pharma began clinical trials on children, causing some to accuse the company of pursuing profits at the expense of child welfare.

In 2012 Purdue Pharma began clinical trials on children, causing some to accuse the company of pursuing profits at the expense of child welfare.

The FDA approval is very specific, requesting that doctors only prescribe these powerful opioids in severe cases of overwhelming need for pain relief, and when no other less-risky option exists. Medical professionals involved in treating addiction note that a small percentage of these patients will indeed develop an addiction to the Oxycontin, which must be managed.

While it is very important to note the very restrictive terms of this FDA approval of Oxycontin for adolescents as young as 11, it is also essential that everyone recognize the rise of prescription painkiller addiction followed over-prescribing by physicians, doctor shopping by patients, illegal sales of diverted drugs “lost” or “misplaced” by pharmacies, stolen from medicine cabinets, or sold by fixed-income seniors and others given easy access to prescription pain killers they didn't need, but sold for side income.

The Importance of FDA Oversight

It is essential that the FDA responsibly consider clinical trial research, and approve medicines that are needed, with strong guidelines that help protect our society from addiction. It is just as important, however, that we protect ourselves against a thriving illegal black market in drugs, provide monitoring and oversight to prevent the diversion of legitimate drugs into those illegal markets, educate people of the risks of addiction, and provide access to addiction treatment.

We must also educate physicians on the risks of prescribing opiates and opioids, and teach them to recognize substance abuse and dependency, while helping them refer patients to effective treatment.

Ocean County DART Coalition Event May 27

Tonight is the Ocean County DART Coalition Forum “Can We Talk – Are You Listening?” at the Pine Belt Arena from 5pm to 9pm. The event is being organized by Ocean County Prosecutor Joseph Coronato, and will focus on the heroin epidemic that is sweeping through New Jersey's communities.

I will be there, along with Ryan Singer from Sunrise Detox Toms River, to answer questions and do everything we can to help support the mission of raising awareness of the heroin problem. Some of what we do in person, that might not be well known:

Answer specific questions about specific situations, such as loved ones with dependencies, concerns about past treatment efforts that didn't work well, state-of-the-art detox and rehab for addiction, family issues when dealing with addiction in the home, etc.
Discuss the nuances of insurance coverage for substance abuse, including real-world facts that are not in the insurance company brochure, or not common knowledge.
Provide direct, honest, informative talks about substance abuse, addiction and treatment, beyond what is normally published or mentioned in public discussions.

Here are a few snapshots of the stage being prepped for tonight's show, which will feature Richie Sambora (guitarist for Bon Jovi). It should be a fun night out with community, addressing an issue that needs as much attention as it can get these days. Sunrise Detox is a proud sponsor and participant.

Sound checks on the stage

Sound checks on the stage while preparing for tonight's DART Coalition Forum on Heroin Addiction in New Jersey

dart-coalition-forum-setup-may2014

Sunrise Detox is a proud supporter of the DART Coalition and Prosecutor Joseph Coronato's efforts to raise awareness of substance abuse and addiction in New Jersey

 

Hard Work Pays Off: Raising Heroin Awareness in NJ

I had the honor or releasing the symbolic balloons to kick off the campaign

I had the honor or releasing 244 symbolic balloons in memory of those who died of heroin overdose in  Ocean and Monmouth counties last year, and the Daily Journal covered it.

Often times the one big message of successful recovery is “hard work pays off”. This week, and this month, and this year, that hard work has been raising awareness of the heroin epidemic in New Jersey, to prevent as much of the fallout from addiction as we can right now.

And the hard work is paying off. The stigma of heroin is starting to go away. Although there is a long way still to go, it is no longer uncommon to hear the word “heroin” in conversation  in our suburbs.

I am seeing an increased awareness of the role of prescription pain killers in our heroin epidemic as well. The “common man” in New Jersey is starting to understand that heroin is just a cheaper, more physically dangerous form of the prescription pain killers prescribed by doctors or “borrowed” from unsuspecting friends and relatives.

Treatment is Available for Opiate Addiction

The time to get treatment for addiction is when a dependency is acknowledged. If that dependency is on prescription pain killers like hydrocodone or oxycodone, Percocet, or any number of other opioids, it is no less a risk than a heroin addiction. The primary risk appears to be the switch to heroin (which is  cheaper, and more readily available). But the other, perhaps more important risk, is the tightening grip of opiate addiction.

Heroin Addiction is best Treated Early, not Late

It is easier and less “costly” in all terms, to treat an addiction earlier, rather than later, regardless of the substance.

“Stigma can be deadly. We hope that this campaign plays a role in busting that stigma and helping the public understand that addiction is a disease.” Celina Gray, Acting Executive Director of the Governor’s Council on Alcoholism and Drug Addiction quoted in the Daily Journal.

This past week Jersey Shore Radio's 107.1 FM Morning Show dedicated virtually an entire week to raising awareness of the heroin problem in New Jersey. Sunrise Detox spent as much time on-site with them as we could. We knew that those seeking help would need someone to talk to. Someone who could answer the real-world questions about addiction and addiction treatment. And since we do that every day, we wanted to help.

Sunrise Detox in New Jersey Malls

We helped people one-on-one at all three malls, every day of the campaign. We spoke honestly about addiction and the grip it has on otherwise smart and strong individuals. We spoke honestly about treatment, insurance, and the untold “costs” of addiction on society. And we told real-world stories that brought the message home to those who needed to hear them.

In some cases we got people directly into treatment. Sometimes at Sunrise Detox, and other times at other treatment centers. The key to successful treatment is immediate medical attention (such as at our medical detox), followed by admission to the appropriate inpatient rehab center, which is usually selected based on individual factors. At Sunrise Detox, we work with individuals and families during the initial detox stage, to understand the rehab process, and select the one that fits.

Keeping Up the Fight: More Heroin Awareness is Needed

This week New Jersey's administration (the Governor’s Council on Alcoholism and Drug Addiction) kicks off another awareness campaign – this time one funded with marketing and advertising dollars, and expected to carry through the entire summer. “Addiction does not discriminate” is a strong message that needs to be heard. Let's raise awareness amongst those who believe that heroin addiction happens to other people, before that devastating addiction pops into their lives unexpectedly, and challenges the entire family unit and more.

 

 

 

Drug Take Back Day in New Jersey: Saturday Oct 26

National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day – Oct. 26, 2013

On Saturday, Oct. 26, the DEA will be holding National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day. From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., you will be able to anonymously dispose of your excess prescription and over-the-counter medications at any of numerous collection sites. In the Morristown, NJ area, more than 90 collection sites will be made available to you.

National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day is intended to help people to safely dispose of their excess medications. As we know, unused medication can be a dangerous lure for those who suffer from drug problems. Additionally, if you attempt to dispose of prescription or over-the-counter medications yourself by flushing them or pouring them down the drain, you can damage our water systems. If you throw away your unused medications, animals or plants can be harmed by them as well.

Here is a list of Drug Take-Back locations in Northern New Jersey:

Northern New Jersey drug take-back locations.

Northern New Jersey drug take-back locations.


Allendale: Allendale Police Department
Allendale Police Department, 290 Franklin Turnpike, Allendale NJ, 07401, NJ

Bayonne: Bayonne Police Department
Bayonne Police Department, 630 Avenue C, Bayonne NJ, 07002, NJ

Bergenfield: Bergenfield Police Department
Bergenfield Police Department, 198 North Washington Ave., Bergenfield NJ, 07621, NJ

Berkeley Heights: Berkeley Heights Police Department
Berkeley Heights Police Department, 29 Park Ave., Berkeley Heights NJ, 07922, NJ

Bernardsville: Bernardsville Police Department
Bernardsville Police Department, 166 Minebrook Rd., Bernardsville NJ, 07924, NJ

Bloomfield: Bloomfield Police Department
Bloomfield Police Department, 1 Municipal Plaza, Bloomfield NJ, 07003, NJ

Bloomingdale: Bloomingdale Police Department
Bloomingdale Police Department, 101 Hamburg Turnpike, Bloomingdale NJ, 07403, NJ

Bound Brook: Bound Brook Police Department
Bound Brook Police Department, 226 Hamilton Street, Bound Brook NJ, 08805, NJ

Stanhope: Byram Twp. Police Department
Shop Rite, 90 Route 206, Stanhope NJ, 07874, NJ

Carteret: Carteret Police Department
Carteret Police Department, 230 Roosevelt Ave., Carteret NJ, 07008, NJ

Cedar Grove: Cedar Grove Police Department
Cedar Grove Police Department, 525 Route 23, Cedar Grove NJ, 07009, NJ

Chester: Chester Twp. Police Department
Chester Twp. Police Department, 1 Parker Road, Chester NJ, 07930, NJ

Clark: Clark Police Department
Clark Police Department, 315 Westfield Ave., Clark NJ, 07066, NJ

Cliffside Park: Cliffside Park Police Department
Cliffside Park Police Department, 525 Palisade Ave., Cliffside Park NJ, 07010, NJ

Cranford: Cranford Police Department
Cranford Community Center, 220 Walnut Ave., Cranford NJ, 07016, NJ

Staten Island: Dea New York Division
Richmond University Medical Center, Main Lobby, 335 Bard Avenue, Staten Island NY, 10310, NJ

Brooklyn: Dea New York Division
New York City Police Department Brooklyn 68 Precinct, 333 65Th Street (Bay Ridge), Brooklyn NY, 11220, NJ

New York: Dea New York Division, 10 Precinct
New York City Police Department Manhattan, 230 West 20Th Street Chelsea, New York NY, 10011, NJ

Staten Island: Dea New York Division, 123Rd Precinct
New York City Police Department Staten Island, 116 Main Street (Tottenville), Staten Island NY, 10307, NJ

Staten Island: Dea New York Division, Chris Hollie
Staten Island University Hospital South Campus, 375 Seguine Ave (Lobby), Staten Island NY, 10309, NJ

Staten Island: Dea New York Division, Chris Hollie 718-226-1911
Staten Island University Hospital North Campus, 475 Seaview Ave (Lobby), Staten Island NY, 10305, NJ

Staten Island: Dea New York Division, Precinct 120
New York City Police Department Staten Island, 78 Richmond Terrace (Stgeorge), Staten Island NY, 10301, NJ

Staten Island: Dea New York Division, Precinct 122
New York Police Department Staten Island, 2320 Hylan Avenue (New Dorp), Staten Island NY, 10306, NJ

New York: Dea New York Division, Precinct 7
New York City Police Department Manhattan, 19 1/2 Pitt Street Lower East Side, New York NY, 10002, NJ

Brooklyn: Dea New York Division, Precinct 84
New York City Police Department Brooklyn, 301 Gold Street, Brooklyn NY, 11201, NJ

East Hanover: East Hanover Police Department
East Hanover Police Department, 2 Deforest Ave., East Hanover NJ, 07936, NJ

East Rutherford: East Rutherford Police Department
East Rutherford Police Department, 117 Stanley St., East Rutherford NJ, 07073, NJ

Edison: Edison Police Department
Edison Police Department, 100 Municipal Blvd, Edison NJ, 08817, NJ

Essex Fells: Essex Fells Police Department
Essex Fells Police Department, 255 Roseland Ave., Essex Fells NJ, 07021, NJ

Fairfield: Fairfield Twp. Police Department
Fairfield Police Department, 230 Fairfield Road, Fairfield NJ, 07004, NJ

Florham Park: Florham Park Police Department
Florham Park Police Department, 111 Ridgedale Ave., Florham Park NJ, 07932, NJ

Somerset: Franklin Twp. Police Department
Franklin Police Department, 495 Demott Lane, Somerset NJ, 08873, NJ

Garfield: Garfield Police Department
Garfield Police Department, 411 Midland Ave., Garfield NJ, 07026, NJ

Glen Rock: Glen Rock Police Department
Glen Rock Police Department, 1 Harding Plaza, Glen Rock NJ, 07452, NJ

Hackettstown: Hackettstown Police Department
Hackettstown Police Department, 215 Stiger St., Hackettstown NJ, 07840, NJ

Haledon: Haledon Police Department
Haledon Police Department, 510 Belmont Ave., Haledon NJ, 07508, NJ

Hasbrouck Heights: Hasbrouck Heights Police Department
Hasbrouck Heights Police Department, 320 Boulevard, Hasbrouck Heights NJ, 07604, NJ

Hawthorne: Hawthorne Police Department
Hawthorne Police Department, 445 Lafayette Ave., Hawthorne NJ, 07506, NJ

High Bridge: High Bridge Borough Police Department
High Bridge Borough Police Department, 99 West Main Street, High Bridge NJ, 08829, NJ

Highland Park: Highland Park Police Department
Highland Park Police Department, 222 South 6Th Ave., Highland Park NJ, 08904, NJ

Hopatcong: Hopatcong Borough Police Department
Hopatcong Police Department- Lobby, 111 River Styx, Hopatcong NJ, 07843, NJ

Jersey City: Hudson County Sheriff'S Office
Hudson County Sheriff'S Office, 257 Cornelison Avenue, Jersey City NJ, 07302, NJ

Oak Ridge: Jefferson Twp. Police Department
Jefferson Twp. Police Department, 1033 Weldon Road, Oak Ridge NJ, 07438, NJ

Kearny: Kearny Police Department
Kearny Police Department, 237 Laurel Ave., Kearny NJ, 07032, NJ

Kenilworth: Kenilworth Police Department
Kenilworth Police Department, 567 Boulevard, Kenilworth NJ, 07033, NJ

Livingston: Livingston Twp. Police Department
Livingston Twp. Police Department, 333 South Livingston Ave., Livingston NJ, 07039, NJ

Mahwah: Mahwah Police Department
Mahwah Police Department, 221 Franklin Turnpike, Mahwah NJ, 07430, NJ

Manville: Manville Police Department
Manville Police Deparment, 2 North Main Street, Manville NJ, 08835, NJ

Maplewood: Maplewood Police Department
Maplewood Police Department, 1618 Springfield Ave., Maplewood NJ, 07040, NJ

Maywood: Maywood Police Department
Maywood Police Department, 15 Park Ave., Maywood NJ, 07607, NJ

Mendham: Mendham Borough Police Department
Morris County Police Academy, 3 Cold Hill Road South, Mendham NJ, 07945, NJ

Metuchen: Metuchen Police Department
Metuchen Borough Hall, 500 Main Street, Metuchen NJ, 08840, NJ

South River: Middlesex County Sheriffs Office
Middlesex County Sheriffs Office, 701 Livingston Ave., South River NJ, 08882, NJ

Middlesex: Middlesex Police Department
Middlesex Police Department, 1101 Mountain Ave., Middlesex NJ, 08846, NJ

Midland Park: Midland Park Police Department
Midland Park Police Department, 280 Godwin Ave., Midland Park NJ, 07432, NJ

Milltown: Milltown Police Department
Milltown Police Department, 39 Washington Ave., Milltown NJ, 08850, NJ

Montclair: Montclair Police Department
Montclair Police Department, 647 Bloomfield Ave., Montclair NJ, 07042, NJ

Morris Plains: Morris County Prosecutor'S Office
Stop & Shop Supermarket, 245 Littleton Rd., Morris Plains NJ, 07950, NJ

Randolph: Morris County Prosecutor'S Office
Randolph Town Hall, 502 Millbrook Ave., Randolph NJ, 07869, NJ

Mountain Lakes: Mountain Lakes Police Department
Mountain Lakes Fire Department, 400 Blvd, Mountain Lakes NJ, 07046, NJ

Mountainside: Mountainside Police Department
Mountainside Police Department, 1385 Rt. 22 East, Mountainside NJ, 07092, NJ

New Brunswick: New Brunswick Police Department
New Brunswick Police Department, 25 Kirkpatrick St., New Brunswick NJ, 08901, NJ

New Providence: New Providence Police Department
New Providence Police Department, 360 Elkwood Ave., New Providence NJ, 07974, NJ

North Arlington: North Arlington Police Department
H&B Pharmacy, 98 Ridge Road, North Arlington NJ, 07031, NJ

North Brunswick: North Brunswick Police Department
North Brunswick Police Department, 710 Hermann Rd., North Brunswick NJ, 08902, NJ

North Plainfield: North Plainfield Police Department
North Plainfield Police Department, 263 Somerset St., North Plainfield NJ, 07060, NJ

Nutley: Nutley Police Department
Nutley Police Department, 228 Chestnut Street, Nutley NJ, 07110, NJ

Ogdensburg: Ogdendburg Police Department
Ogdensburg Police Department, 14 Highland Ave., Ogdensburg NJ, 07439, NJ

Palisades Park: Palisades Park Police Department
Palisades Park Police Department, 275 Broad Ave., Palisades Park NJ, 07650, NJ

Piscataway: Piscataway Police Department
Piscataway Police Department, 555 Sidney Road, Piscataway NJ, 08854, NJ

Rahway: Rahway Police Department
Rahway Police Department, 1 City Hall Plaza, Rahway NJ, 07065, NJ

Ramsey: Ramsey Police Department
Ramsey Police Department, 25 North Central Avenue, Ramsey NJ, 07446, NJ

Whitehouse Station: Readington Twp. Police Department
Readington Twp. Police Department, 507 Rt. 523, Whitehouse Station NJ, 08889, NJ

Ridgefield: Ridgefield Borough Police Department
Ridgefield Municipal Building, 604 Broad Ave., Ridgefield NJ, 07657, NJ

Ridgefield Park: Ridgefield Park Police Department
Ridgefield Park Police Department, 234 Main St., Ridgefield Park NJ, 07660, NJ

Ridgewood: Ridgewood Police Department
Ridgewood Police Department, 131 N. Maple Avenue, 2Nd Floor, Ridgewood NJ, 07450, NJ

Ringwood: Ringwood Police Department
Ringwood Police Department, 60 Margaret King Ave., Ringwood NJ, 07456, NJ

River Edge: River Edge Police Department
River Edge Police Department, 705 Kinderkamack Rd., River Edge NJ, 07661, NJ

Rochelle Park: Rochelle Park Twp. Police Department
Rochelle Park Police Department, 151 West Passaic St., Rochelle Park NJ, 07662, NJ

Succasunna: Roxbury Twp. Police Department
Roxbury Recreation Center, 72 Eyland Ave., Succasunna NJ, 07876, NJ

New Brunswick: Rutgers Unitverity Police Department
Rutgers Student Center- Community Policing Office, 126 College Ave., New Brunswick NJ, 08901, NJ

Rutherford: Rutherford Police Department
Rutherford Police Dept., 184 Park Ave., Rutherford NJ, 07070, NJ

Hillsborough: Somerset County Sheriff'S Office
South County Public Works Garage, 410 Roycefield Rd., Hillsborough NJ, 08844, NJ

Somerville: Somerville Police Department
Somerville Police Department, 24 S. Bridge St., Somerville NJ, 08876, NJ

South Plainfield: South Plainfield Police Department
South Plainfield Police Department, 2480 Plainfield Ave., South Plainfield NJ, 07080, NJ

South River: South River Police Department
South River Police Department, 61 Main Street, South River NJ, 08882, NJ

Sparta: Sparta Twp. Police Department
Sparta Twp. Police Department, 65 Main Street, Sparta NJ, 07871, NJ

Summit: Summit Police Department
Summit Pd, 512 Springfield Ave., Summit NJ, 07901, NJ

Teaneck: Teaneck Police Department
Teaneck Police Department, 900 Teaneck Rd., Teaneck NJ, 07666, NJ

Waldwick: Waldwick Police Department
Waldwick Public Safety Complex, 15 E. Prospect St., Waldwick NJ, 07463, NJ

Warren: Warren Twp. Police Department
Warren Twp. Police Department, 44 Mountain Blvd., Warren NJ, 07059, NJ

Long Valley: Washington Twp. Police Department
Washington Twp. Police Department, 1 East Springtown Road, Long Valley NJ, 07853, NJ

Washington Township: Washington Twp. Police Department
Washington Twp. Police Department, 350 Hudson Ave., Washington Township NJ, 07676, NJ

Watchung: Watchung Police Department
Watchung Police Department, 840 Somerset St., Watchung NJ, 07069, NJ

Wayne: Wayne Twp. Police Department
Wayne Police Department, 475 Valley Road, Wayne NJ, 07470, NJ

West Caldwell: West Caldwell Police Department
West Caldwell Police Department, 21 Clinton Road, West Caldwell NJ, 07006, NJ

West Orange: West Orange Police Department
West Orange Town Hall, 66 Main Street, West Orange NJ, 07052, NJ

Westfield: Westfield Police Department
Westfield Police Department, 425 E. Broad St., Westfield NJ, 07090, NJ

Woodbridge: Woodbridge Police Department
Woodbridge Police Department, 1 Main Street, Woodbridge NJ, 07095, NJ

Wyckoff: Wyckoff Police Department
Wyckoff Police Department, 1 Scott Plaza, Wyckoff NJ, 07481, NJ