Addiction Education

In Rockville Center, Long Island for Town Hall

Sunrise Detox in Rockville Center, Long Island

A great message from kids for kids

Rockville Center Against Youth Substance Abuse

The Rockville Center, Long Island Town Hall meeting tonight is dedicated to “Underage Drinking and Drug Use”, and Sunrise Detox is there represented by myself (Joe Horrocks) and my associate Joe Chelales.

The topics of discussion range widely from prevention through treatment issues, with concerned parents, loved ones, police and policy makers looking to discuss all sort of related issues. With the rise in heroin use, a record numbers of overdose deaths in NY & on Long Island, people want information and answers.

Community Support for Keeping Kids Safe

Tonight's meeting is co-sponsored by the Rockville center Coalition for Youth, the RVC School District, the RVC Youth Council, the RVC Police Dept., as well as Dynamic Youth COmmunity, “Don't Press Send”, St. Agnes, and Senator Todd Kaminsky's office.

Joe Chelales Sunrise Detox on Long Island

Joe Chelales of Sunrise Detox on Long Island at the Rockville Center Town Hall

The kids have done a great job with Live your Life Drug Free” T-shirts, and a community Scrabble board made up of tiles contributed by students.

Some of the messages the kids placed into their “Tile Your Own Way” Scrabble board? Everything from the classics like “Crack is Wack” and “Don't Be A Fool, Stay In School” to a few I have never seen before, including “Don't Do Drugs, The Thrill Can Kill“, “Destroy What Destroys You” and “A Friend Indeed won't make you Smoke that Weed“.

Rockville Center residents address the Town Hall panel to discuss the need for Narcan response in the community (an emergency response to heroin overdose)

Sunrise Detox on Long Island

We will be busy tonight offering information and insider knowledge to everyone with questions, as much as we can. There is never enough information when you are faced with an addiction in your family, or your own life, or when addressing an epidemic of drug and alcohol abuse in the community.

Life After Narcan

Everyone living in New Jersey these days is aware of the ongoing heroin epidemic. It is impossible to escape the daily news of overdoses, deaths, and crises related to drug use and heroin in our communities, sprinkled with occasional news of actions taken to address the problem.

More Addiction Treatment in New Jersey

Sunrise Detox opened 2 new full-sized treatment centers in New Jersey to help address this epidemic. With medical detox centers in Stirling (Long Hill), Toms River (Ocean County) and Cherry Hill, Sunrise Detox manages 79 beds in New Jersey, helping over ten thousand people per year get needed addiction treatment.

Increasing use of Naloxone (Narcan)

Many New Jersey municipalities were overrun with urgent demands for emergency services related to heroin overdose. They have increased use of naloxone, commonly known as Narcan.

Naloxone is a drug which reverses the effect of narcotic pain killers and heroin. It can save a life if administered in time. While naloxone has been available to emergency medical staff and physicians for over 30 years, until recently it was very tightly regulated under the law. It was not available over the counter, and was illegal to possess by anyone other than those supervised by a physician.

In 2013 the NJ Overdose Protection Act (S2082) was passed to allow even citizen first responders to administer naloxone in an emergency. In 2014 Sunrise Detox worked closely with the Ocean County Prosecutor to bring a Narcan pilot program into Ocean and Monmouth counties, greatly increasing availability of naloxone in those counties.

The pilot was a great success. Over 200 overdose reversals were recorded in the first 7 months in just those two counties.

Naloxone availability has since expanded throughout the state, driven by the need to respond to thousands of overdoses. But a significant problem remains : people continue to die.

Narcan is an emergency response tool, but not an answer to heroin addiction. Overdosing addicts saved by emergency use of Narcan are still dying after they return to their lives, often just days after being saved.

They need addiction treatment.

Life After Narcan — Understanding Addiction

Sunrise Detox collaborated with the Narcan pilot program to provide expertise and professional addiction education to the entire team, and by dedicating treatment center beds to the program for those saved by Narcan.

Sunrise Detox representatives worked closely with the entire team while the pilot program provided medical detox and addiction treatment to those saved by administration of naloxone, at several facilities serving Ocean and Monmouth counties.

Narcan is a great way to prevent an overdose death, but effective addiction treatment is the only way to save the lives lost to addiction, including the deaths from overdose that cannot be saved by naloxone.

If there is to be Life After Narcan, that life must include addiction treatment. It is essential to get individuals into a treatment program immediately, at the moment they are willing to accept help, and before withdrawal sickness drives them to resume using drugs.

Understanding Addiction Treatment

After treating over 70,000 individuals and their families in New Jersey, Atlanta, and Florida, we have learned that a respectful, comfortable medical detox under the care of an experienced addiction treatment team is the absolute best start to a successful recovery. We now want to help all New Jersey stakeholders understand what that entails, and how to best prepare for success addressing the addiction epidemic hurting our communities, beyond the improved emergency response.

Please watch the websites for Sunrise Detox in Stirling/Long Hill, Toms River, and Cherry Hill for a series of informational articles and blog posts in a new category labeled “Life After Narcan“.

We are dedicating this effort to raising awareness of the important issues that must be addressed as we continue to make progress in the battle against addiction in New Jersey, including the use of naloxone.

If you would like to contribute, or have additional questions, please contact us by phone or an email address setup specifically for this activity : AfterNarcan @ SunriseDetoxTomsRiver.com

Ocean County DART Coalition Event May 27

Tonight is the Ocean County DART Coalition Forum “Can We Talk – Are You Listening?” at the Pine Belt Arena from 5pm to 9pm. The event is being organized by Ocean County Prosecutor Joseph Coronato, and will focus on the heroin epidemic that is sweeping through New Jersey's communities.

I will be there, along with Ryan Singer from Sunrise Detox Toms River, to answer questions and do everything we can to help support the mission of raising awareness of the heroin problem. Some of what we do in person, that might not be well known:

Answer specific questions about specific situations, such as loved ones with dependencies, concerns about past treatment efforts that didn't work well, state-of-the-art detox and rehab for addiction, family issues when dealing with addiction in the home, etc.
Discuss the nuances of insurance coverage for substance abuse, including real-world facts that are not in the insurance company brochure, or not common knowledge.
Provide direct, honest, informative talks about substance abuse, addiction and treatment, beyond what is normally published or mentioned in public discussions.

Here are a few snapshots of the stage being prepped for tonight's show, which will feature Richie Sambora (guitarist for Bon Jovi). It should be a fun night out with community, addressing an issue that needs as much attention as it can get these days. Sunrise Detox is a proud sponsor and participant.

Sound checks on the stage

Sound checks on the stage while preparing for tonight's DART Coalition Forum on Heroin Addiction in New Jersey

dart-coalition-forum-setup-may2014

Sunrise Detox is a proud supporter of the DART Coalition and Prosecutor Joseph Coronato's efforts to raise awareness of substance abuse and addiction in New Jersey

 

Hard Work Pays Off: Raising Heroin Awareness in NJ

I had the honor or releasing the symbolic balloons to kick off the campaign

I had the honor or releasing 244 symbolic balloons in memory of those who died of heroin overdose in  Ocean and Monmouth counties last year, and the Daily Journal covered it.

Often times the one big message of successful recovery is “hard work pays off”. This week, and this month, and this year, that hard work has been raising awareness of the heroin epidemic in New Jersey, to prevent as much of the fallout from addiction as we can right now.

And the hard work is paying off. The stigma of heroin is starting to go away. Although there is a long way still to go, it is no longer uncommon to hear the word “heroin” in conversation  in our suburbs.

I am seeing an increased awareness of the role of prescription pain killers in our heroin epidemic as well. The “common man” in New Jersey is starting to understand that heroin is just a cheaper, more physically dangerous form of the prescription pain killers prescribed by doctors or “borrowed” from unsuspecting friends and relatives.

Treatment is Available for Opiate Addiction

The time to get treatment for addiction is when a dependency is acknowledged. If that dependency is on prescription pain killers like hydrocodone or oxycodone, Percocet, or any number of other opioids, it is no less a risk than a heroin addiction. The primary risk appears to be the switch to heroin (which is  cheaper, and more readily available). But the other, perhaps more important risk, is the tightening grip of opiate addiction.

Heroin Addiction is best Treated Early, not Late

It is easier and less “costly” in all terms, to treat an addiction earlier, rather than later, regardless of the substance.

“Stigma can be deadly. We hope that this campaign plays a role in busting that stigma and helping the public understand that addiction is a disease.” Celina Gray, Acting Executive Director of the Governor’s Council on Alcoholism and Drug Addiction quoted in the Daily Journal.

This past week Jersey Shore Radio's 107.1 FM Morning Show dedicated virtually an entire week to raising awareness of the heroin problem in New Jersey. Sunrise Detox spent as much time on-site with them as we could. We knew that those seeking help would need someone to talk to. Someone who could answer the real-world questions about addiction and addiction treatment. And since we do that every day, we wanted to help.

Sunrise Detox in New Jersey Malls

We helped people one-on-one at all three malls, every day of the campaign. We spoke honestly about addiction and the grip it has on otherwise smart and strong individuals. We spoke honestly about treatment, insurance, and the untold “costs” of addiction on society. And we told real-world stories that brought the message home to those who needed to hear them.

In some cases we got people directly into treatment. Sometimes at Sunrise Detox, and other times at other treatment centers. The key to successful treatment is immediate medical attention (such as at our medical detox), followed by admission to the appropriate inpatient rehab center, which is usually selected based on individual factors. At Sunrise Detox, we work with individuals and families during the initial detox stage, to understand the rehab process, and select the one that fits.

Keeping Up the Fight: More Heroin Awareness is Needed

This week New Jersey's administration (the Governor’s Council on Alcoholism and Drug Addiction) kicks off another awareness campaign – this time one funded with marketing and advertising dollars, and expected to carry through the entire summer. “Addiction does not discriminate” is a strong message that needs to be heard. Let's raise awareness amongst those who believe that heroin addiction happens to other people, before that devastating addiction pops into their lives unexpectedly, and challenges the entire family unit and more.

 

 

 

10% of America’s Heroin Addicts Live in New Jersey

According to Radio 107.1 FM, 10% of the nation's heroin addicts live in New Jersey.

This week, I'm helping Radio 107.1 FM to raise awareness about the heroin epidemic that is ravaging our local communities. It's a serious problem; according to on-air statistics, 10% of all heroin addicts nationwide live in New Jersey.  Last year, more people died from heroin overdose than from vehicular DWI accidents, and addicts are as young as 10 years old.

3 Malls with Experts On-Hand to Help

On May 19th through May 23rd, from 7am until 10pm, Sunrise Detox staff will be at all three locations covered by this event. Joe Horrocks will be on-hand at Freehold Raceway Mall, Ryan Singer will be at Ocean County Mall, and I will be supporting our efforts from Monmouth Mall. Each of us are on-site answering questions and working with clinicians to try and help people to get into treatment immediately.

Ocean County deaths doubled from 2012 to 2013.

We've set up a call center specifically for this event to help raise awareness about New Jersey's heroin problem; if you or someone you know needs help, they can call us at (877)759-9757.

Raising Awareness of a Growing Problem

Statistics prove that the problem of heroin addiction in our state is quite severe. Since 2006, heroin use in New Jersey has tripled. The number of opiate overdose deaths jumped about 33% from 2011 to 2012. In Ocean County, which includes parts of the Jersey Shore, heroin deaths more than doubled between 2012 and 2013. These staggering numbers underscore a critical reality; that many of our fellow citizens desperately need help.

Real Help, Right Now

After just 2 days, we are seeing results. Parents, siblings, and neighbors have come down and voiced their concern and desire to help people they know, or loved ones who have problems with substance abuse or are in treatment, or recovery. Some have come down to admit they need help, and told us stories of their friends overdosing and in some cases dying in their presence. We've already helped a few people get into treatment immediately – in one case literally going from the mall directly to a treatment center.

Get Help and Advice, Right Now

Come on down to Ocean County Mall, Freehold Raceway Mall, or the Monmouth Mall and meet our professionals, counselors, admissions experts, and others who have come to provide help and assistance. Ask about how addiction starts, the connections between legal prescription pain killers and heroin, the symptoms of drug abuse, and the importance of getting medical assistance as soon as a dependency is recognized.

If you or someone you love has a problem with alcohol or drug use, stop by and you will find a friendly, informative ear to listen and provide expert advice, or call (877)759-9757

107 Hours of Radio: Raising Awareness of New Jersey’s Heroin Epidemic

Monmouth Radio show "PorkRoll & Eggs" will begin broadcasting for 107 hours on 5/19 at 6am, to help raise awareness of the heroin addiction problem in New Jersey.

Monmouth Radio show “PorkRoll & Eggs” will begin broadcasting for 107 hours on 5/19 at 6am, to help raise awareness of the heroin addiction problem in New Jersey.

Nina, Tom and A.J. from 107.1 FM's popular Porkroll & Eggs morning show, are dedicating a week of attention to New Jersey's heroin epidemic, and we want to show our support.

Starting May 19th at 6am, the Porkroll & Eggs Morning Show from 107.1 FM will begin broadcasting live for 107 hours at various locations throughout Monmouth & Ocean counties in New Jersey. Sunrise wants to support this effort, and will have representatives on-hand to provide information and answer questions, and helping those who need assistance find it.

Nina, Tom and A.J. will be stationed in the parking lots of the Monmouth Mall, Freehold Raceway Mall, and Ocean County Mall to help raise awareness about the heroin epidemic taking place right now in our communities.

“Heroin and opiate abuse has become a staggering problem in Monmouth and Ocean Counties. New Jersey is now home to over 10% of the nations heroin addicts, most of whom are between the ages of 17 & 26 years old.” –Porkroll & Eggs

The organizers continue “It is a problem that affects us all, regardless of social status. These are our neighbors and friends, our kids and their peers, dealing with this in schools and at parties and even in our own homes. One of the hardest issues to address is denial. If you think it won’t touch you in some way because of who you are or where you live, you are wrong. Heroin is in your town, it’s a problem and it’s spreading.”

As part of this event, stationary bikes will be setup at each location for anyone to ride. The Jules L. Plangere, Jr. Family Foundation will be donating $1 for every mile ridden on each bike at all locations, up to $25,000, to local charities that fully fund recovery programs.

For more information, visit 107 Radio

Thoughts on Self-Esteem, Self Image, Addiction and Recovery

The Legend In Our Minds

Most of us have heard the expression “He's a legend in his own mind.”  Although we don't usually think of this as being accurate (or nice), the fact is that we are, in a sense, all legends in our own minds.

We all have a self-concept, a collection of mental images.  Our self-concept (Legend) is our answer to the question, “Who am I?”  It tells us what we like, how we're like — or different from — others, where we belong in the world and our community, and what we've been like in the past.

Recovery is an uphill climb. Sometimes our internal view of ourselves sets the stage for how steep that climb might be.

Recovery is an uphill climb. Sometimes our internal view of ourselves.. the “story” or “Legend” within our own minds, sets the stage for how steep that climb might be.

The Personal Legend

This personal Legend is how we usually think about ourselves.  The details can change, but for most of us the underlying story remains the same.  Sometimes our Legend even approaches reality, but since it is our Legend, not necessarily fact, and because it is shaped by the way we think about our past and our present, it sometimes becomes a bit twisted, and at times even just plain wrong.

Our self-concept, or self-image, is mostly shaped by our understanding of the things that have happened in our life: the things we have done and the things that were done to us.  For that reason, it's not uncommon for a person (especially an addict) to end up with one of those twisted Legends.

Twisted Legends : A False Sense of Self

Much of our Legend is shaped by what we believe others think, or thought, about us.  If we were treated badly, especially as children, if we failed to get the love, nurturing and gentle attention that we needed, if we were emotionally or physically abused, or had addicted parents who were unable to fulfill our needs because they were themselves impaired, our self-concept may become twisted and cause us to believe things about ourselves that aren't true.

Our Self Concept shapes our Self Esteem

That's not good because our self-concept shapes our self-esteem (what we think of our Legend).  Unconsciously, we give ourselves a sort of grade.  If we see ourselves as competent people and value ourselves for who we are, instead of who we wish we were, we usually get a pretty high grade.  But most of us addicts look at the Legend we have constructed for ourselves and think that we are inadequate, incompetent, and unlovable.  Most likely we picked up this idea from people who themselves lacked a healthy self-concept, and we have since viewed our lives and our behavior in that light: “I'm not good enough.”  “No one will love me unless I _________.”  “I deserve whatever I get.”  “I'm no good.” “I don't deserve to be treated well.” “I don't deserve to treat myself well, because I'm a piece of junk.”

And a common way to handle that pain is “I can’t stand this, I’ve gotta get high!

Realizing Self Worth as a Step Towards Recovery

Well, guess what.  God doesn't make junk.  Regardless of how much we believe our Legend, if it's telling us that sort of stuff it needs to be re-written.  We'll cover that next.  For now, just remember:  Good self-concept = good Legend.  Bad self-concept = bad Legend = poor self-esteem.  Poor self-esteem makes it impossible to re-write our Legend.  We need to question all those bad beliefs we have about ourselves.  Are they true?  Who says so?  Who told us that to begin with?  Could they have been…wrong?