John M. Blog

Seabrook House Foundation’s Golf Outing 2012

John F. Moriarty III and Stokes Aitken, of Sunrise Detox.

One of my many perks of marketing and outreach is attending charity events that support recovery.

On September 21, 2012 Sunrise Detox sponsored Seabrook House Foundation's Golf Outing at Seaview Resort, in Gallway, New Jersey. The outing benefited those in need of treatment but who are unable to financially afford the increasing costs of treatment today.

Sunrise Detox Sponsored the Longest Drive Contest and donated $2500 to this great cause. Joining me were Stokes Aitken, the CFO of Sunrise Detox Center, and Terry Cronin, a New Jersey based interventionist.

Great weather and networking with addiction professionals from all over the country was had by all.

The Recovery Network of Programs Annual Golf Outing

Members of the addiction and treatment center industry showed up in support of The Recovery Network of Programs, which is a private, non-profit behavioral health provider in Connecticut serving economically disadvantaged/afflicted individuals.

Recovery Network of Programs Annual Golf Tournament

Foursome winners of the golf outing at -15 gross score. John F. Moriarty III (R) and Ray Palmer, (Right Center) VP of operations, Mountainside Treatment Center and 2 guests

 

John F. Moriarty III with Matt Eakin, SR. VP of Marketing and Admissions at Mountainside Treatment Center. Mountainside invited John F. Moriarty III to attend the Recovery Network of Programs Annual Golf Outing.
John is gloating his foursomes victory with Matt.

The Golf Club at Oxford Greens
99 Country Club Road
Oxford, CT 06478

National Association of Social Workers New York City 44th Annual Addictions Institute Conference

New York City Chapter 44th Annual Addictions Institute Conference
National Association of Social Workers
Wednesday, June 6, 2012
Fordham University Lincoln Center Campus
113 West 60th St. at Columbus Avenue New York, NY 10023

Sunrise Detox along with 33 other providers exhibited and sponsored the conference the theme Trauma and Addictions across the life cycle.

Lisa Baruch of Crossroads Centre Antigua

John Moriarty of Sunrise Detox Center (New Jersey) with Lisa Baruch of Crossroads Centre Antigua at Fordham University, Lincoln Center, New York

Don’t Decriminalize Marijuana Possession in New Jersey

State lawmakers recently advanced a reckless bill that would make possession of 15 grams of marijuana, or approximately 30 joints, punishable by fines similar to those for driving up to 20 mph over the speed limit. As someone who has long advocated for treatment rather than jail for nonviolent drug offenders, I am concerned this fine is akin to legalizing marijuana.

A “slap on the wrist” approach will only further reinforce the misconception that marijuana is not a gateway to drug addiction. At Sunrise Detox, a large number of patients have admitted marijuana was a gateway drug that helped encourage them to experiment with stronger recreational drugs. Those who think a half-ounce of marijuana is a nominal amount are kidding themselves.

Some members of our state Legislature are being hypocritical: Last year, they advocated for a universal ban of synthetic marijuana because of its deadly effects and gateway drug tendencies. Now, they are telling us marijuana should be decriminalized. Which is it?

This legislation calls for a maximum $500 fine for third and subsequent offenses. The question is, when does treatment enter the picture? A structured penalty system, including early treatment, must be established before considering this law.

Originally featuerd on NJ.com

Proposed New Jersey Law Neglects Need For Increased Drug Abuse Prevention

First time, non-violent drug offenders may soon get a second chance by having their criminal record expunged thanks to New Jersey bill A2829.

New Jersey legislators Jerry Green, Annette Quijano, and Bonnie Watson Coleman are sponsoring a bill to remove the criminal record of first offense, non-violent drug offenders.

According to the statement from the lawmakers, “To qualify for automatic expungement, the person cannot have been convicted of any prior crime or have been adjudged a disorderly person or petty disorderly person on more than two prior occasions; the conviction cannot be for any of the crimes that are ineligible for expungement under subsections b. and c. of N.J.S.2C:52-2; and the person cannot have had a previous criminal conviction expunged regardless of the lapse of time between the prior expungement and the completion of a sentence to special probation.”

While this bill is an important step in handling these cases, we need more to prevent drug offenses.

The efforts of some New Jersey lawmakers to introduce legislation that would automatically expunge the criminal records of first-time, nonviolent drug offenders is a sensible idea that should earn strong bipartisan support.

But in my role as a detoxification expert, my concern is how these individuals end up as drug offenders in the first place. State lawmakers need to know that between 60 and 70 percent of opiate dependents who arrive at Sunrise Detox and other such treatment centers are under 30 years old, don't have full-time jobs, and have committed petty crimes to support their habit.

If we are truly going to reduce the number of drug users in New Jersey, we need to redouble our efforts at prevention. Once individuals have been apprehended, they likely have been drug abusers for years. In many cases, permanent damage has already been done.

Before this legislation is formally introduced, my hope is that state legislators closely examine the drug prevention programs already in place, analyze what other states are doing in the area of prevention, and develop a two-pronged solution.

Originally published on phillyBurbs.com and NorthJersey.com.

Prevention of Drug Crimes is At Least As Important as Management

New Jersey lawmakers are looking closely at the prisons and how they are full of drug offenders these days. Many are considered “low-level” or non-violent offenders.

The efforts of some New Jersey lawmakers to introduce legislation that would automatically expunge the criminal records of first-time, nonviolent drug offenders is a sensible idea that should earn strong bipartisan support.

But in my role as a detoxification expert in New Jersey, my concern is how these individuals end up as drug offenders in the first place.  State lawmakers need to know that between 60 and 70 percent of opiate dependents who arrive at Sunrise Detox and other such treatment centers are under 30 years old, don't have full-time jobs, and have committed petty crimes to support their habit.

If we are truly going to reduce the number of drug users in New Jersey, we need to redouble our efforts at prevention. Once individuals have been apprehended for a drug-related crime (especially the petty crimes under scrutiny now), they likely have been drug abusers for years. In many cases, permanent damage has already been done.

Before this legislation is formally introduced, my hope is that state legislators closely examine the drug prevention programs already in place, analyze what other states are doing in the area of prevention, and develop a two-pronged solution.

New Jersey Bans Sale of Synthetic Marijuana

New Jersey has become the 4th state in the nation to ban the sale of all synthetic marijuana. There are various forms of this drug that contain dangerous chemicals and are designed to have the same effect on the users brain as standard marijuana. Known variants include brand names such as “K2,” “Spice,” “Down 2 Earth,” “Comatose Candy,” and “Space Cadet.” Possession, sale or manufacture of these drugs is punishable by three to five years in prison and a fine of up to $25,000.

According to the New Jersey Attorney General's office, synthetic marijuana can cause devastating effects on the user.

  • 92 percent of the synthetic marijuana exposure cases reported to New Jersey Poison Information and Education System in 2011 resulted in a need for treatment in a healthcare facility
  • Synthetic marijuana has been linked to violent seizures, elevated heart rates, anxiety attacks, and hallucinations, according to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration and the National Institute on Drug Abuse.
  • Some users have committed suicide or suffered fatal injuries after having extreme panic attacks that were directly attributed to synthetic marijuana use.
  • Reports published in peer-reviewed journals associate synthetic marijuana use with psychosis in some patients.
  • In 2010, poison control centers received reports about five deaths nationwide associated with synthetic marijuana.
  • 14-year-old Brandon Rice, of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, died at Children’s Hospital in Lawrenceville, Pennsylvania on October 27, 2011. He had been using synthetic marijuana smoked from a Pez candy dispenser. The severe damage to his lungs resulted in four months of suffering, prior to his death of an infection following a double lung transplant.

http://www.greenwichtime.com/news/article/NJ-targets-sale-of-synthetic-marijuana-3370303.php
http://www.ctpost.com/news/article/NJ-targets-sale-of-synthetic-marijuana-3370303.php
http://www.stamfordadvocate.com/news/article/NJ-targets-sale-of-synthetic-marijuana-3370303.php
http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/article/NJ-targets-sale-of-synthetic-marijuana-3370303.php