What Are The 12 Steps?

This is the first in a series of posts in which we hope to acquaint our readers with some of the details surrounding the programs that we recommend.  There are a variety of other programs, but because we and most other facilities shape our treatment plans around the 12 Step fellowships, those are the ones on which we will concentrate.

Twelve step groups have been much in the news over the past few years.  Most people have heard about one or another celebrity who was in AA (Alcoholics Anonymous), NA (Narcotics Anonymous) SAA (Sex Addicts Anonymous), or another of the roughly 200 fellowships more or less based on AA’s original 12 Steps.

The steps as we know them today were first published in the book “Alcoholics Anonymous” (1939). They were a synthesis of the combined experiences of the first roughly 100 members of the fellowship that took its name from the book, combined with principles from other sources.  There are far too many good histories of AA for me to presume to go further.

Essentially, the 12 steps are designed to change the way we look at addiction, our lifestyles, and the problems they have caused. They help us to accept the reality of our problems, identify issues, and guide us in clearing up “the wreckage of the past.” Finally, they provide us with means to continue to nurture our new way of life, and encourage us to help others achieve the same goals.

The steps work — for people who put in the effort.  However, they require quite a bit of work in order to gain the benefits. Many people who give recovery a try find that they are not able to do the work that is needed, for whatever reasons.  That isn’t surprising, because change is frightening, and because we alcoholics and addicts are accustomed to getting what we want quickly.  How long until I can connect to my next fix, pill, or exciting experience?  Is the sun “over the yardarm” yet, so that I can give myself permission to have that first drink?

After all that time thinking in the short term, it becomes difficult to think in any other way. Thus, when faced with several months or years of working on making changes in our lives and thinking, many of us find it difficult to knuckle down and get started.  Combine this with the ability of all addicts to find reasons, excuses and so forth for avoiding unpleasant things, and the ever-present temptations of old people, places and things, and we can see that there are some real obstacles to successfully completing the necessary work. This is true of all recovery programs, not just those based on the steps. As they say in the rooms, “It works if you work it, but it won't if you don't.”

In our Friday post, and those following, we will cover the steps and the rest of the program in more detail.

Comments

  1. Castimonia says:

    It is my personal belief that it was important for me to know that the 12-steps Wilson used came in large part from the Oxford Bible group. I read this in The Twelve Steps for Christians. It is my opinion that every Christian, addict or not, should go through a 12-step program to help them surrender more to Christ and less to themselves.

  2. I agree that some people may find that helpful. However, it is one of my purposes in this series to make it clear that a particular belief system is not necessary in order to work the steps and live a spiritual life. I have seen mistrust of religion drive people away from the Steps. Thus you will find that I tend to soft-pedal the religious interpretation in favor of more general ideas. My agenda is to promote recovery, not outside issues.

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