When do you know that you don’t want to do any more drugs?

I’ve been skipping over this question for a while, because there is no way that the answer can be anything but subjective. I can’t possibly answer it for someone else. I finally decided that it’s too important just to blow off with an excuse. Someone asked that question because they were still hurting, and someone else out there is too. Subjective it will have to be.

In my own case, I knew it some time before I got clean and sober, but I just didn’t think it was possible. I knew what happened if I went even for short periods without alcohol or a substitute, and there was no way (that I could see) to quit. But did I want to be free? Oh yes, desperately!

That’s the first part of the answer — the bottom that we talk about. The solution was forced upon me by my boss, who had a better grasp of the possibilities than I. After three weeks of detox and treatment, aftercare, a few hundred 12-step meetings and with the help of my newfound recovering friends, I was in fairly decent shape.

But the question still isn’t answered. When did the craving, the need go away? I honestly can’t say. The intensive program I was working kept me so busy that I hardly had time to think about using. At a couple of points down the line I got the impulse to have a drink or use. Looking back, I can attribute that directly to relationship and work difficulties that I still hadn’t learned to deal with in a less self-destructive way. At least one of those was a case of “drinking at” someone (except, thank goodness, I didn’t).

The desire to turn my brain off with drugs just disappeared when I wasn’t looking. At some point, I realized that I hadn’t thought about using for some time, and wasn’t especially interested in thinking about it then — and it’s been that way ever since. I don’t know if I was especially fortunate in that regard or not. Just as one person can never know (nor judge) another’s pain, so can I not relate my cravings, or lack of them, to someone else’s.

What I can do is tell you why they went away. I found better ways to cope with life. My program, the people in the 12-step rooms, the wonderful friends I made, the relationships that I developed with my wife, kids and other family, and the feeling of self-worth I got from helping others were all so much better that I couldn't imagine throwing that all away — again.

I believe there are three stages to recovery. The first occurs while we’re still using, when we decide we want out. The second is early on, when we are taking the first steps toward learning to live without drugs, and the third is the “maintenance phase,” where we keep on doing the things that helped us to begin with, and things keep getting better as a result. That’s exactly the way the 12 steps work, and I reached that point through their help. It’s not the only way, but it has worked for me and a lot of other folks I know.

And I haven’t wanted to do any more drugs for a long time now.

What about you? What was your experience? Please comment!

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